About Texas Wing Chun

The Philosophy We Live By


The average person should be able and ready to defend themselves and their loved ones at all times. The art should function for small persons, the elderly and children. We strive to keep the information as simple as possible.

Texas Wing Chun


Our interpretation of Wing Chun is pragmatic, reality based on physics, geometry, gross anatomy, and human biomechanics proven on the field of battle. It strives for efficiency in every aspect of our lives and specifically in combat. It stresses that you must have sound structure to oppose another in a struggle for your life.

Wing Chun helps us locate, evaluate and exploit our opponents’ weaknesses and strengths. It teaches us to conserve energy while concentrating and delivering power. It teaches us to be aware of all that is around us and to use our surroundings as weapons or to our advantage. It teaches us to defend ourselves and those we love against those whom would do us harm. It makes us efficient and productive in all aspects of our lives..


Our Line of Wing Chun

(1893-1972) deceased

(1918-1978) deceased

California

California

Florida retired

Orlando Florida

Jacksonville Florida

Arlington, Texas

Dr. Scott Mullen

Chiropractic Medical Doctor

Dr. Scott Mullen Attended Parker College. Review his Course Work Below

Dr. Mullen is a semi retired Chiropractor who makes time to teach a small number of dedicated students in Arlington Texas [About halfway between Dallas and Fort Worth Texas]. The training hall {kwon} is about 1000 square feet and across from Arlington high school and just south of UTA on Cooper street.

Dr. Mullen’s degrees include a doctorate in Chiropractic and Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and Biology He has been teaching Wing Chun in Texas since 1994. 

Dr. Mullen grew up in a law enforcement family; his father was an FBI agent under J Edgar Hoover. This allows him to share information that is common knowledge to law enforcement but is mostly unknown to the general public.


AN 311 Human Embryology2
(3 credits, 45 hours)
Study of the development of the human body from conception through birth, with additional emphasis on congenital defects and their causes.


AN 315 Systemic Anatomy

(5 credits, 90 credits)
In this lecture and laboratory course, students study the anatomy and structure of the human body. Special emphasis is placed on the bones, muscles, and nerves of the body. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the anatomic plan of the human body using a systemic approach to prepare the student for Gross Anatomy. Models will be used to illustrate the anatomical features in the laboratory.

CP 692 Ethics
(1 credit, 5 hours)
This course introduces the chiropractic professional code of ethics as it deals with patients, business, and inter- and intra- professional relationships.

MP 315 Human Cell Biology
(3 credits, 5 hours)
This course is a study of the basic life processes of Eukaryotic cells. Emphasis will be on the relationships between structure and function at the cellular level. The major topics covered will be reproduction and growth of cells, energy, membranes, transport, organelles, specialized structures and tasks, genetics, mitosis, meiosis and cell cycle.

AN 327 Human Gross Anatomy I
(6 credits, 20hours)
This is a lecture and laboratory dissection course. The focus of this course will be on the study of the regional, three-dimensional anatomy of the back, thorax, head and neck. Emphasis will be on the osseous, muscular, blood vascular and peripheral nervous system structures of each region.

AT 312 Palpation I
(2 credits, 45 hours)
This course introduces the student to normal anatomical spinal structures and landmarks. Both motion and static palpation of the spine are introduced and the student is taught to differentiate between normal and aberrant motion. The spinal subluxation is defined and students are taught to locate subluxations in the cervical, thoracic, lumbar spine and pelvis.

RE 273 (CP 3202) Research and Statistics
(2 credits, 30 hours)
Research and Statistics is an introduction to the concepts of scientific research in the health care field. Students will learn to use information resources, become familiar with chiropractic literature and learn how to evaluate research articles. The course will acquaint students with descriptive statistics (correlation, regression, and variance) and tests of significance. The goal of the course is to produce primary health care providers who can stay current with and critically evaluate scientific clinical research.

AT 324 Spinal Biomechanics
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This course introduces the concept of spinal biomechanics. Procedures are developed to evaluate normal and abnormal joint dynamics. The objective is an understanding of the clinical biomechanics of the spine, and the basis for diagnosis and the scientific application of treatment.

PB 327 Human Physiology I

(3 credits, 45 hours)
Physiology I examine the basic principles involved in the operation of all systems. Special emphasis is placed on the principles of diffusion, osmosis, membrane transport, nerve action potentials and synaptic transmission, the biochemical and mechanical properties of contractile tissues, temperature regulation, blood and an introduction to ANS and endocrine function. These principles will be the foundation on which PB 437 and PB 446 are built.

PB 328 Human Biochemistry
(5 credits, 75 hours)
This course of study is a comprehensive consideration of the basic biochemical principles, properties, structures and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, vitamins and minerals. In addition, a complete examination of metabolic mechanisms and their regulations is interwoven into the overall control of the biochemistry of the human organism.

XR 433 Normal Radiographic Anatomy I
(2.5 credits, 45 hours)
This course focuses on the recognition and understanding of normal radiographic images, normal variations and congenital anomalies of the osseous structures of the axial skeleton. An introduction to roentgen metrics of the axial skeleton will also be provided.

AN 326 Human Neuroscience I
(4 credits, 75 hours)
The lecture portion of this course will emphasize the structural and functional aspects of the nervous system. The main objective of this course is to provide the student with a clear understanding of the organizational concepts and principles associated with the neurosciences. The topics of discussion will include the development and gross anatomy of the nervous system, vascularization, the basic microscopy of the nervous system along with the response of nerve cells to injury, the nerve receptors, and effectors of the peripheral nervous system, spinal cord structure, reflexes, and pathways, the structural and functional organization of the brain stem and cranial nerves, and the special sensory systems, i.e., visual, vestibular, and auditory. The laboratory portion of this course will endeavor to present a hands-on opportunity of the student to work with human neurological specimens and models. Lab sessions are introduced with video-camera demonstrations and videotape presentations. Structural and functional correlations of all material is emphasized and encouraged.

AN 433 Human Gross Anatomy II

(6 credits, 120 hours)
This course is a continuation of Human Gross Anatomy I and utilizes lecture and laboratory dissection. The focus of this course will be on the study of the regional, three-dimensional anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and perineum and the extremities. The emphasis will be on the osseous, muscular, blood vascular and the peripheral nervous system structures of each region.

AT 323 Palpation II
(2 credits, 45 hours)
This course continues refining the skills learned in Palpation I and introduces the student to motion palpation of the extremities. The principles and art of static and motion palpation of vertebral structures and extremity joints are further developed and practiced, and students develop the tactile abilities to locate and identify spinal structures and landmarks of the extremities.

AT 432 Extra-Spinal Biomechanics
(3 credits, 45 hours)
The biomechanical functions of the extremities are introduced in this course. Procedures are developed to evaluate normal and abnormal joint dynamics. The objective will be an understanding of the clinical biomechanics of the extremities, and the basis for diagnosis and the scientific application of treatment for these disorders.

PB 437 Human Physiology II

(5 credits, 90 hours)
The operation and regulation of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are included in the Physiology II course. These systems are considered independent systems in terms of their integration with other body systems under normal conditions and during stress (exercise, heart failure, etc.) Laboratory sessions are an integral portion of the course and include an introduction to clinical case studies.

XR 434 Normal Radiographic Anatomy II

(2.5 credits, 45 hours)
This course focuses on the recognition and understanding of normal radiographic images, normal variations and congenital anomalies of the osseous structures of the appendicular skeleton. An introduction to roentgen metrics he appendicular skeleton will be provided

AN 436 Human Neuroscience II
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This lecture course is a continuation of the material presented in Neuroscience I. The main objective of this course is to enable the student to integrate and correlate the didactic material presented with clinical situations. It is of paramount importance for the student to recognize and appreciate the complexities of the circuitry involved with the nervous system. The topics of discussion will include the autonomic nervous system, a detailed discussion will include the autonomic nervous system, a detailed discussion of the cranial nerves, pain, the gustatory system, action and receptor potentials, synaptic transmission, neurotransmitters, pain modulations and mechanoreceptors, the diencephalons, basal nuclei, olfactory and limbic systems, the cerebral hemispheres, and topics of special interest, i.e., sleep, consciousness and the neurobiology of ageing.

DX 557 Clinical Orthopedics
(4 credits, 75 hours)
This course introduces students to proper orthopedic examination procedures and tests for the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, pelvis, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, knee, ankle and foot. It also presents an organized system for approaching musculoskeletal disorders and introduces students to the necessity of differentially diagnosing between musculoskeletal disorders and visceral disease processes. Some specific chiropractic procedures for the detection of certain common “presenting complaints” are also discussed.

DX 441 Physical Diagnosis

(5 credits, 90 hours)
This course introduces the basic principles, procedures and instrumentation used in physical examinations. Procedures include evaluation of the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, gastrointestinal and sensory systems. Ear, eye, nose, throat and dermatological conditions are also presented as they relate to chiropractic practice.

MP 438 Human Pathology I
(5 credits, 75 hours)
Pathology I is a study of the etiology and development of diseases in the human with emphasis on the basic principles of pathology. The primary objective of this course is to build a basic understanding in the science of pathology so that the student may understand disease processes and recognize these processes in their patients.

PB 446 Human Physiology III
(5 credits, 90 hours)
Physiology III is a systems and integrative approach to the renal, gastrointestinal and reproductive systems of the body. Laboratory sessions are an integral part of the course and the lab utilizes case studies to emphasize clinical application of physiological principles.

XR 554 Radiographic Exam Techniques
(2 credits, 45 hours)
This course concentrates on the skills and knowledge required to properly perform an optimal radiographic examination. Both lab and lecture will emphasize patient positioning and protection, technique calculations, and instrument operation.

DX 569 Diagnosis I

(3 credits, 45 hours)
The Chiropractic student will become acquainted and proficient in a repeatable, formalized diagnostic system of thinking and narrative/case reporting of major disease entities. Emphasis is placed on musculoskeletal differential diagnosis and entities that simulate musculoskeletal pain, or entities seen or encounter in Chiropractic offices.

DX 445 Clinical Neurology
(4 credits, 75 hours)
This course builds upon neuroanatomy and neurophysiology by presenting clinical neurological conditions. Students are also introduced to neurological testing and examination procedures, and their significance in diagnosis and chiropractic management.

MP 449 Human Pathology II
(4 credits, 60 hours)
Pathology II is an examination of the manifestations of diseases in the major organ systems of the body and the specific important diseases as they relate to the major systems.

XR 443 Diagnostic Imaging Interpretations
(Bone Pathology I)
(4 credits, 75 hours)
This course takes a systematic approach to radiographic interpretation of the osseous elements of the human body when they are subjected to change under the influence of pathophysiological processes. Radiographic observations will be intimately correlated with clinically relevant physical and biochemical findings. Categories of bone pathology discussed will include: neoplasms, infections, and congenital, vascular, nutritional, metabolic and endocrine disorders.

CP 560 Physiological Therapeutics I

(3 credits, 60 hours
This course examines massage, traction, and trigger point therapies. Exercise is discussed in light of its therapeutic and rehabilitative functions. The types and applications of orthotics are also discussed.

DX 443 Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat

(2 credits, 30 hours)
This course examines disorders of the eye, ear, nose, and throat with respect to their etiology, symptomatology, clinical significance, and chiropractic management.

DX 555 Diagnosis II
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This course provides a more in-depth study of the diagnosis of the visceral systems of the body with emphasis on the clinical significance of various disorders. Systems studied include cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal and genitourinary. Emphasis would be placed on examination techniques, diagnostic tests, and assimilating and correlating information to eventually form a plausible diagnosis.

XR 565 Diagnostic Imaging Interpretations
(Bone Pathology II)
(4 credits, 75 hours)
The main objective of this course is to provide the student with a systematic radiographic approach to the understanding of various arthropathies and traumatic injuries as they relate to the musculoskeletal.system. Radiographic observations will be intimately correlated with clinically relevant physical and biochemical findings. Therapies of choice will also be discussed. An emphasis will be placed on the spine and pelvis.

CP 681 Clinical Psychology

(4 credits, 60 hours)
This course has two main goals. The first is learning the use psychological principles in dealing with patients. Crisis intervention, communications skills and training, therapeutic effectiveness in psychosomatic illness, stress reduction as well as pain management are included. The second goal of the course is the recognition of psychopathological conditions to help the students in treatment planning and referral.

DX 688 Obstetrics/Gynecology
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This course introduces the basic concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions specific to the female patient. The course examines the anatomical and physiological processes occurring in pregnancy and childbirth as they are clinically relevant to the practicing chiropractor. Adjusting for the pregnant female will also be discussed.

CP 660 Physiological Therapeutics II
(3 credits, 60 hours)
This course focuses on the physical therapy modalities used in the chiropractic profession. For all modalities, emphasis will be on basic physics, physiological effects, indications, and contraindications. Special emphasis will be on those modalities most applicable to chiropractic care.

DX 442 Dermatology
(2 credits, 30 hours)
This course examines dermatological disorders with respect to their etiology, symptomatology, and clinical significance as primary conditions and as secondary manifestations of underlying disorders, with the discussion of their respective chiropractic management.

XR 677 Diagnostic Imaging Interpretation
(Soft Tissue Pathology)
(3.5 credits, 60 hours)
This course deals with the fundamental concepts of radiographic interpretation of normal variance and disease processes of the soft tissue of the chest and abdomen. Clinical and lab findings will be correlated with the radiographic depiction of the pathology. Follow-up diagnostic procedures will be discussed.

DX 677 Geriatrics/Pediatrics
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This is a primary course in the diagnosis and treatment of physical and psychosocial conditions unique to infants, children and the elderly. Emphasis is placed on examination and chiropractic adjusting procedures for each of these specific groups.

CS 760 Rehabilitation Procedures
(2 credits, 45 hours)
In addition to clinical experience, this course will present information on the rehabilitation aspect of the musculoskeletal system. The purpose of this class is to instruct students on the accepted procedures and protocols in the rehabilitation arena in conjunction with chiropractic care. The primary focus will be musculoskeletal rehabilitation with the goal of increasing strength, coordination, and ROM (Range of Motion), while receiving chiropractic manipulation to increase nervous system capacity. This approach has been well documented for increased patient well being and health.

DX 656 Laboratory Diagnosis II
(2 credits, 30 hours)
This course is a progression of Laboratory Diagnosis I where students are taught to interpret laboratory data as they apply to systemic diseases. Actual cases will be presented and discussed in a classroom setting as to how laboratory results can contribute to the final diagnosis. Emphasis will be placed on advanced testing procedures as they apply to different disease processes.

XR 688 Diagnostic Imaging Review
(2 credits, 30 hours)
The purpose of this course is to refine the student’s radiographic skills in interpretation of the seven basic categories of bone disease and soft tissue disease. This will be accomplished by taking a critical radiographic and clinical approach to problem solving. All case presentations will emphasize management and interdisciplinary approach to patient care.

XR 901 Special Imaging
(2 credits, 30 hours)
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the senior student with special radiographic studies such as MRI, CT, bone scan and others. The goal of the course is not to teach students to read these special images, but to be familiar with them, be able to interpret reports and know when it is appropriate to order these tests.

DX 557 Clinical Orthopedics
(4 credits, 75 hours)
This course introduces students to proper orthopedic examination procedures and tests for the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine, pelvis, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hand, knee, ankle and foot. It also presents an organized system for approaching musculoskeletal disorders and introduces students to the necessity of differentially diagnosing between musculoskeletal disorders and visceral disease processes. Some specific chiropractic procedures for the detection of certain common “presenting complaints” are also discussed.

DX 441 Physical Diagnosis
(5 credits, 90 hours)
This course introduces the basic principals, procedures and instrumentation used in physical examinations. Procedures include evaluation of the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, gastrointestinal and sensory systems. Ear, eye, nose, throat and dermatological conditions are also presented as they relate to chiropractic practice.

MP 438 Human Pathology I
(5 credits, 75 hours)
Pathology I is a study of the etiology and development of diseases in the human with emphasis on the basic principals of pathology. The primary objective of this course is to build a basic understanding in the science of pathology so that the student may understand disease processes and recognize these processes in their patients.

PB 446 Human Physiology III
(5 credits, 90 hours)
Physiology III is a system and integrative approach to the renal, gastrointestinal and reproductive systems of the body. Laboratory sessions are integral part of the course and the lab utilizes case studies to emphasize clinical application of physiological principals.

XR 554 radiographic Exam Technique
(2 credits, 45 hours)
This course concentrates on the skills and knowledge required to properly perform an optional radiographic examination. Both lab and lecture will emphasize patient positioning and protection, technique, calculations, and instrument operation.

DX 558 Diagnosis I
(3 credits, 45 hours)
The chiropractic student will become acquainted and proficient in repeatable, formalized diagnostic system of thinking and narrative/case reporting of major disease entities. Emphasis is placed on musculoskeletal differential diagnosis and entities that stimulate musculoskeletal pain or entities seen or encounter in Chiropractic offices.

DX 445 Clinical Neurology
(4credits, 75 hours)
This course builds upon neuroanatomy and neurophysiology by presenting clinical neurological conditions. Students are also introduced to neurological testing and examination procedures, and their significance in diagnosis and chiropractic management.

MP 438 Human Pathology I
(5 credits, 75 hours)
Pathology I is a study of the etiology and development of diseases in the human body with emphasis on the basic principals of pathology.
The primary objective of this course is to build a basic understanding in the science of pathology so that the student may understand disease processes and recognize these processes in their patients.

XR 443 Diagnostic Imaging Interpretation
(Bone Pathology I)
4 credits, 75 hours
This course takes a systematic approach to radiographic interpretation of the osseous elements of the human body when they are subjected to change under the influence of pathophysiological processes. Radiographic observations will be intimately correlated with clinically relevant physical and biochemical findings. Categories of bone pathology discussed will include: neoplasms, infections, and congenital, vascular, nutritional, metabolic and endocrine disorders.

CP 560 Physiological Therapeutics I
(3 credits, 60 hours)
This course examines massage, traction and trigger point therapies Exercise is discussed in light of its therapeutic and rehabilitative functions. The types and applications of orthotics are also discussed.

XR 443 Diagnostic Imaging Interpretation
(Bone Pathology I)
4 credits, 75 hours
This course takes a systematic approach to radiographic interpretation of the osseous elements of the human body when they are subjected to change under the influence of patholophysiological process. Radiographic observations will be intimately correlated with clinically relevant physical and biochemical findings. Categories of bone pathology discussed will include: neoplasms, infections, and congenital, vascular, nutritional metabolic and endocrine disorders.

DX 559 Diagnoses II
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This course provides a more in-depth study of the diagnosis of the visceral systems of the body with emphasis on the clinical significance of various disorders. Systems studied include cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal. Emphasis would be placed on examination techniques, diagnostic tests, and assimilating and correlating information to eventually from a plausible diagnosis.

CP 681 Clinical Psychology
(4 credits, 60 hours)
This course has two main goals. The first is learning the use psychological principles in dealing with patients. Crisis intervention, communications skills and training, therapeutic effectiveness in psychosomatic illness, stress reduction as well as pain management are included. The second goal of the course is the recognition of psychopathological conditions to help the students in treatment planning and referral.

DX 688 Obstetrics/Gynecology
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This course introduces the basic concepts in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions specific to the female patient. The course examines the anatomical and physiological processes occurring in pregnancy and childbirth as they are clinically relevant to the practicing chiropractor. Adjusting for the pregnant female will also be discussed.

CP 660 Physiological Therapeutics II

(3 credits, 60 hours)
This course focuses on the physical therapy modalities used in the chiropractic profession. For all modalities, emphasis will be on basic physics, physiological effects, indications, and contraindications. Special emphasis will be on those modalities most applicable to chiropractic care.

DX 442 Dermatology
(2 credits, 30 hours)
This course examines dermatological disorders with respect to their etiology, symptomatology, and clinical significance as primary conditions and as secondary manifestations of underlying disorders, with the discussion of their respective chiropractic management.

XR 677 Diagnostic Imaging Interpretation
(Soft Tissue Patholo
3.5 credits, 60 hours
This course deals with the fundamental concepts of radiographic interpretation of normal variance and disease processes of the soft tissues of the chest abdomen. Clinical and lab findings will be correlated with the radiographic depiction of the pathology. Follow-up diagnostic procedures will be discussed.

DX 677 Geriatrics/Pediatrics
(3 credits, 45 hours)
This is a primary course in the diagnosis and treatment of physical and psychosocial conditions unique to infants, children and the elderly. Emphasis is placed on examination and chiropractic adjusting procedures for each of these specific groups.

CS 760 Rehabilitation Procedures
(2 credits, 45 hours)
In addition to clinical experience, this course will present information on the rehabilitation aspect of the musculoskeletal system. The purpose of this class is to instruct students on the accepted procedures and protocols in the rehabilitation arena in conjunction with chiropractic care. The primary focus will be musculoskeletal rehabilitation with the goal of increasing strength, coordination and ROM (Range of Motion), while receiving chiropractic manipulation to increase nervous system capacity. This approach has been well documented for increased patient well being and health.

DX 656 Laboratory Diagnoses II
(2 credits, 30 hours)
This course is a progression of Laboratory Diagnosis I where students are taught to interrupt laboratory data as they apply to systemic diseases. Actual cases will be presented and discussed in a classroom setting as to how laboratory results can contribute to the final diagnosis. Emphasis will be placed on advanced testing procedures as they apply to different process.

XR 688 Diagnostic Imaging Review
(2 credits, 30 hours)
The purpose of this course is to refine the student’s radiographic skills in interpretation of the seven basic categories of bone skills in interpretation of the seven basic categories disease and soft tissue disease. This will be accomplished by taking a critical radiographic and clinical approach to problem solving. All case presentations will emphasize management and interdisciplinary approach to patient care.

XR 901 Special Imaging
(2 credits, 30 hours)
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the senior student with special radiographic studies such as MRI, CT, bone scan and others. The goal of the course is not to teach students to read these special images, but to be familiar with them, be able to interrupt reports and know when it is appropriate to order these tests.